The Stubenberghaus has always been a popular destination for visitors of the Schöckl

The Stubenberghaus has always been a popular destination for visitors of the Schöckl

Built in the years 1889 to 1890, the Stubenberghaus – named after the Count Stubenberg – celebrated its grand opening on September 15, 1890. In 1930, the shelter for mountaineers was supplied with electric light and in 1936, the beautiful South Terrace was built.

In the spring of 1999, architect Karl-Heinz Winkler won an architectural competition to renovate the 100 year old Stubenberghaus. His ideas were selected mainly because of his careful handling of the existing fabric of the building and the integration of infrastructural measures, combined with the creation of utility rooms and additional guest rooms on the north side of the Stubenberghaus.

The most convincing change Winkler proposed was the development of a new access way on the east side of the building with contemporary architectural elements, visually breaking with the historical parts of the building. Four separate dining areas were created and a meeting room was installed beneath the terrace, oriented to the south, with a view deep into the Styrian lands and all the way to Slovenia. The static and constructive work done at the Stubenberghaus bore some initial surprises, which culminated in the construction of 60 timber studs to support the logwalls. The south-facing sidewall had to be secured with sprayed concrete and several rock anchors.

On the first and second floor of the Stubenberghaus, 16 guest rooms were equipped with bathrooms through an external systems building, accommodating the request not to make any substantial changes to the existing timbers. The existing larch shingles were renewed copying the exact material, form and shape of their historical counterparts.

1909: the first car on the Schöckl mountain – the Puch 18/22HP

1909: the first car on the Schöckl mountain – the Puch 18/22HP

In addition to the extended south terrace, two new terraces facing south and west are planned, so that self-service areas can be installed for day trippers on very busy days, separate from the existing restaurant area.

The  restoration of the Stubenberghaus – as a significant landmark on the Schöckl mountain and also a significant landmark for the city of Graz – manifested the unbreakable will of everyone involved to keep a high standard of architectural quality using local materials only, and also to keep the symbiosis intact between the landscape and the building – a building that was initially planned as an alpine shelter in the 19th century.

The Graz-based section of the Styrian alpine club is presented with a renovated Stubenberghaus that is convincing in both terms of beauty and contents. A jewel of traditional Styrian building culture, whose preservation for the future was only made possible thanks to the huge involvement of the public.

Text adopted from Bundesdenkmalamt Österreich (Austrian Monuments Office) – Denkmal des Monats Juni 2001